I want to volunteer!

How can I help out?

We have lots of opportunities to volunteer! The easiest way to start is to just come to one of our meetings on the 1st Tuesday of every month. We also have a few committees that are slowly (in some cases very slowly, since we have so many things we want to fix!) growing. As WWRHAH grows, we’ll eventually need more committees and have even more opportunities to volunteer!

These are our current committees:

  • Outreach Committee, Chair: Open

Going to speak with various neighbor groups of ours at their meetings to network and see what we might be able to work together on, and speaking with area businesses from time to time to see what issues are cropping up. A great example is the 2013-2014 Roxbury Safety study. We teamed up with other neighborhood groups and made that happen. You also may like to attend the Southwest and Delridge District Council meetings on our behalf, or even the higher level City Neighborhood Council meetings if that interests you. If you’re a people person, this is for you.

  • Infrastructure Committee, Chair: Chris Stripinis

Everything from SDOT and street maintenance to lighting and plumbing issues. This is definitely the committee with the biggest backlog of issues, but every little problem that we help knock down makes a visible, material improvement to our neighborhoods — sometimes for decades.

  • Metro Committee, Chair: Amanda Kay Helmick

Everything to do with King County Metro. There isn’t always a lot to do here (some of the work is shouldered by the West Seattle Transportation Coalition, which was founded initially out of WWRHAH in 2013) but when there is, it’s usually particularly annoying problems that affects everything from our transportation to livelihoods.

  • Roxhill Bog Committee, Chair: Open

This is a group of very talented people who are experts in various areas of environmentalism, ecology, and forestry, but they can definitely use all of the help that they can get. Some of the work isn’t technical — it’s equal parts outreach and research, as well, with groups like Seattle Public Schools, the Nature Conservancy, and the Audobon Society. For an example of their work, read our March 2014 meeting notes, especially toward the end. Eventually, once the Roxhill Bog issues are done, we’ll still have other greenbelts and areas like this in our large neighborhoods that will need our help, and we can rename the committee then. This group is going to be busy for years.

What sounds most interesting to you? Come to one of our meetings and tell us.

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