Area groups petition SDOT for safety study of SW Roxbury Street

Seattle, Washington & King County – July 22, 2013

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The Westwood/Roxhill/Arbor Heights Community Council (WWRAHCC), after receiving feedback from residents over several months, began a discussion with the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) about safety on SW Roxbury Street. Our Infrastructure Committee reached out to SDOT and our neighboring neighborhood groups to began gathering data on this. The desire was to ask SDOT to commit to and began a full safety study on SW Roxbury, and to look for ways to improve pedestrian, motorist, and bicyclist safety on the arterial.

Today, with endorsements from the WWRAHCC, the Highland Park Action Committee (HPAC), the North Highline Unincorporated Area Council (NHUAC), and the Community School of West Seattle, we submitted this study request to SDOT. Our three neighborhood groups represent up to 35,166 residents for whom SW Roxbury is a major arterial and connection to our highways at SR-99 and SR-509, as well as a main walking and bicycling route connecting the neighborhoods.

Pedestrian safety on SW Roxbury Street is a serious concern, particularly for children attending Roxhill Elementary and Holy Family schools. Despite school zone lights, crosswalks and speed limit signs, vehicles routinely travel well above the posted 30 MPH limit. Meanwhile, features such as wheelchair ramps and crosswalks are lacking in many areas.

Consider these recent statistics from SDOT and an ongoing survey they were conducting in June 2013. Despite a speed limit of 30 MPH on SW Roxbury:

  • 39% of vehicles traveling eastbound towards the Roxhill Elementary school zone were going faster than 35 MPH in the area.
  • 10% were traveling 39 MPH or faster in that same area.
  • Likewise, 13.5% of vehicles exceeded 35 MPH in the school zone at 20th Avenue, directly in front of Holy Family School.

Some of the potential outcomes from this requested safety study may include:

  • Increasing pedestrian safety, particularly in the two school zones.
  • Reducing vehicle speeds, especially for top-end speeders.
  • Improving crosswalks for schools and for general pedestrians.
  • Reducing the number of accidents and collisions for all users.

We all look forward to the findings of the upcoming SDOT study.

If you are a group, business, or representative of the area and would like to endorse this request, please contact us at: contact@wwrhah.org to be added to a page on our website of endorsers, on www.wwrhah.org.

Population data:

  • Roxhill/Westwood population: 6,730 (source: US census, city-data.com)
  • Arbor Heights population: 5,054 (source: US census, zillow.com)
  • Highland Park population: 5,982 (source: US census, city-data.com)
  • North Highline population: 17,400 (source: Seattle & King County Public Health

Please click here for a PDF copy of the letter that was sent to both city and county officials:

SW Roxbury Street safety issues letter – July 22 2013

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3 thoughts on “Area groups petition SDOT for safety study of SW Roxbury Street

  1. While safety in this area of Roxbury is certainly of concern, I’d like to point out another very dangerous area on the same road toward the east as it becomes Olson Place. I have witnessed several serious crashes near 4th and 3rd Avenues SW as well as fatalities. Additionally, there is a bus stop on the east bound side of the road that I and several other neighbors from 3rd and 4th avenues have to access. There is NO crosswalk and cars often are traveling down the hill at 50+ miles an hour. We have to play “frogger” to get across the street on a daily basis. It is hugely dangerous and frustrating that this area seems to be overlooked by those concerned with making our streets and neighborhoods safer.

  2. Pingback: August 13, 2013 WWRHAH meeting notes | Westwood/Roxhill/Arbor Heights Community Council

  3. Pingback: September 10, 2013 WWRHAH meeting notes | Westwood/Roxhill/Arbor Heights Community Council

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